SN2014J – supernova in M82 – DE

M82 and SN2014J with D50 telescope.

Image of M82 and SN 2014J obtained with the D50 telescope on January 25th, 2014.

The nearest type Ia supernova in 400 years has been found in the Messier 82 (M82) galaxy. First spotted on 21 January 2014, it is relatively close to Earth, about 11.4 million light years away!
This supernova is called SN2014J (the 10th supernova discovered so far during 2014), and is a rare kind. „Type Ia“ supernovae (SNe) are believed to be caused by exploding white dwarf stars. These SNe explode with very predictable brightnesses, making them ideal ’standard candles‘ to measure distances to galaxies accurately.

Now that it has reached maximum brightness, around Jan 31 (with a magnitude in the R band of about 10), GLORIA will keep monitoring the SN2014J light-curve (along with other supernovae) for the next few months as part of the regular program conducted by some of the GLORIA partners. Indeed, many astronomical observatories worldwide (including space-borne facilities) will point to this unique target regularly over the coming weeks.

M82 and SN2014J with D50 telescope.

Image of M82 and SN 2014J (M81 galaxy on the right) obtained with the BART telescope wide field camera on January 25th, 2014.

Personal Space, the sky «I like» – DE

Geminids
The birthday for someone, the graduation day for someone else. The day of your first kiss, or your first day of employment, or maybe the day of your last cigarette. Our lives are punctuated by memorable moments. But how was then the sky right above your head?

Personal Space” is there to answer the question. It is a free web-based application developed within the GLORIA project by a team of astronomers lead by Robert Simpson (University of Oxford) and Lorraine Hanlon (University College Dublin), and an artist, Emer O Boyle (University College Dublin). Personal Space turns the celestial sphere into a huge, boundless social network. Establishing direct and personal connections to the universe by linking significant events in your own life with what was above you in the sky at that moment. And with people all around the world who shared that portion of the sky with us.

„I am an astronomer, I have lots of reasons for looking at different bits of the sky. But what is the bit of the sky that is most obvious for people to look at? I am told by non-astronomer friends that you want to look directly up», said Robert Simpson. «So what is directly above my head right now? That is the idea behind Personal Space».

See video on YouTube
See reference document here
Read the press-release
Go to the web site personal-space.eu